Un anno di Beatles – 9

Buses and Submarines

As we are having to talk about thirteen albums within a year’s agenda that’s made up of only twelve months, we’ve decided to deal with two albums in one go (although in reality they were not released one after the other). We’ve chosen two that have been considered ‘less important’, they are both connected with a film and answer to the titles of Magical Mystery Tour and Yellow Submarine.

They are works that have been much debated: Magical Mystery Tour owing to the definitely uninspiring quality of the film, even though the record contains masterpieces of indisputable beauty; the other because, although it’s true that the yellow submarine is an icon of the psychedelic world, the quality of the work is not to the same standard as any other album by the Fab Four. Apart from anything else, there are only songs – and not very important ones – on one side; the B-side has been given over to music written and orchestrated by George Martin as the film’s soundtrack.

So this time we will limit ourselves to compiling a list of tracks from both of the albums and briefly discussing them. What with the ones that have been released as singles in their own right and the various versions that have been published of MMT, there’s quite some confusion going on!
At this point we hardly need to highlight the fact that “All You Need Is Love” came out just five weeks after Sgt. Pepper’s, and was written only a couple of days before the live world TV show was broadcast that made its fame! Whenever you try to emphasise the band’s incredible capacity for composing, it is these kinds of details that should be remembered. But here are the songs from the two albums.

1.    Magical Mystery Tour
2.    The Fool on the Hill
3.    Flying
4.    Blue Jay Way
5.    Your Mother Should Know
6.    I Am The Walrus
7.    Hello, Goodbye
8.    Baby, You’re a Rich Man
9.    All You Need Is Love
10.  Yellow Submarine
11.  Only a Northern Song
12.  All Together Now
13.  Hey Bulldog
14.  It’s All Too Much

They may be two albums that don’t excel, but they could have made one album out of it quite easily! There are moments of excellent composing and arrangements such as in “I Am the Walrus”, “Hello Goodbye”, “The Fool on the Hill” and “All You Need Is Love”. The majority of musicians on this planet would pay gold to have just one of these pieces in their name, but in actual fact this time two albums are needed just to make one decent one. Even though it must be said that actually they came about as parallel projects to the films, and so there wasn’t the driving force of creating an official album.
The guitar is present but not always audible, often hidden behind woodwind sections, such as is the case in the title track of the first film: the piece is a rather pushed rock piece but the rhythmic guitar that carries the beat is hidden in the mix. On the other hand, the guitar is more than evident in “Flying”, with a lovely opening that is the richer to listen to thanks to a vibrato.
The rhythmic acoustic part that marks the beat in “Yellow Submarine” is very obvious indeed, as is also the case in “All Together Now”: these are two light-hearted pieces that reap the benefits of a six-string acoustic.
“Hey Bulldog” is another piece with a rather strong taste of rock characterised by a distorted electric riff, as well as by the solo half-way through the piece. “It’s All Too Much” seems like a Jimi Hendrix piece if you listen to the opening, played by a distorted electric guitar that immediately produces a mighty electric feedback, that continues to play responding to Harrison’s voice and accompanying it. If you exclude “Revolution #9”, “I Want You” and “Hey Jude”, it is the longest piece to have appeared on a Beatles’ album.
“All You Need Is Love” has a beautiful electric guitar solo, although the rest of the piece is full of orchestral instruments that play all the most important parts.

Arrangements
It can’t be emphasised enough how the great work of George Martin in arranging the pieces made everything splendidly cohesive: the four of them (above all John and Paul, for obvious reasons) demanded what was seemingly impossible, always expecting a ready solution for technical problems as well as musical ones. But their original instruments continued to feature less and less in the overall sound, and although it’s true that their minds pushed to create the things that they ‘felt’ in their heads but didn’t know how to make happen in practice, it’s also true that without the contribution of their producer many of these albums would never have existed, or would have had a very different form. Each of them experimented with new instruments, and it must be highlighted that the standard of Paul McCartney’s bass lines has never gone below excellent: his sound became more full-bodied with every song thanks to the new recording techniques; and the lyricism of many passages should be studied by anybody trying their hand at this instrument. As for all the arrangements, pop as we know it today was born in those months, in those years and in those albums. There’s no artifice or combination of instruments that wasn’t experimented with by those four, even with an incredible poverty of technical means. Today any teenager with a computer has access to a number a thousand times higher of possibilities… if only that was enough to produce masterpieces!

Voices
The matter is similar to that already discussed in the previous chapters: they treated voices as instruments in their own right; each passage is fitted perfectly into the spaces left by the orchestra or by guitars, pianos, percussion or what have you. Practically every piece has been embellished by one chorus or another, so that one hardly notices anymore – it’s become standard practice. And the best is yet to come.


Winston’s Thoughts


by Davide Canazza

Magical Mystery Tour and Yellow Submarine are certainly the two records in the history of the Beatles with less guitar parts. At that time, George Harrison was envolved in the sitar playing and he was neglecting his main instrument. But in a late May evening of 1967 he happened to attend a live concert of Jimi Hendrix, and after hearing what he could get out of a Stratocaster, he decided it was the time to take back the guitar.
The result was that the day after he recorded “It’s All Too Much”, a song with a Hendrix-style guitar introduction with lots of feedback effects, distorted sounds and a massive use of the tremolo bar of his Sonic Blue Strat. A few days after this guitar would receive its famous psychedelic painting and it was soon renamed ‘Rocky’.

The most used guitar by Harrison in both albums is just the Fender Stratocaster, while Lennon remained devoted to his Epiphone Casino. From the videos made during the sessions of “Hey Buldog” and “Lady Madonna” you can realize that George used the Gibson SG guitar, a guitar that John also played in some degree. The sequences from the movie and the guitar style should let us suppose that “Hey Buldog” guitar solo could have been played (with the SG) by John!
However, the guitars will be again the stars of the Beatles recordings on the White Album, but we’ll talk about between a month.


Manzoni vs. Lennon-McCartney


by Giuseppe Cesaro

My Italian literature teacher at Secondary School used to say with ill-concealed (and not completely unjustified) pride that, if all the books that had been published on The Betrothed were gathered together, they would fill Milan Cathedral. Well! I think that to gather up everything that has been published about the Beatles not even the Maracanã Stadium would be sufficient.
Of course, quantity is not necessarily a synonym of quality (even the Bay City Rollers have sold truck-loads of albums) but it’s still a statistic to think about. In the Beatles’ case (the most striking, but by no means the only one) quality and quantity are indisputably tied to a cause-effect relationship: the latter, in fact, depends directly upon the former.
Therefore, writing about the Beatles is almost impossible, if the objective is to say something that hasn’t already been said, something new, something original. If this is what you’re expecting, then stop here. Whoever decides to go on, does so at the risk of having more than one déjà vu. What I can offer is a reflection that develops from those visual corners that haven’t been visited much. The idea is to highlight and juxtapose some aspects that aren’t strictly speaking ‘technical’, but nevertheless allowed the ingredients to bind together in a unique and unrepeatable way, breathing life into the most astonishing, refined and nourishing dish in the history of culinary rock art. What can I say? Enjoy your meal!

Above… them… only sky…
Let’s put it like this: if rock music was a skyscraper, then blues would have chosen and conquered the ground and got the design started, Elvis would have finished the design and built the skyscraper, and the Beatles would have opened, furnished and lived in all the rooms, showing the world how amazing it all was.
Of course, between then and now, the excellent ‘tenants’ that have lived in that skyscraper – enriching it with their culture, music, sensitivity and technique – are uncountable. I won’t name names: it would be impossible. There’s no space. And then everyone has their own list. The Fab Four, however, bask in a sort of ‘ius primae notis’ (in the sense of ‘notes’) that has earned them the right to reserve the penthouse suite – the floor closest to the enchanted empire in which great ideas live, waiting for some particularly enlightened souls to gather them up, give them a form and make them visible (or as in our case: audible) to common mortals, helping them to tackle those hailstones of question marks without answers that we call existence.
So what is so mind-blowing about the Beatles phenomenon? Just about everything. To look at it closely, in fact…

Before Them? The Deluge!

Above all, when speaking about contemporary popular music (a definition in which I personally would include any musical affiliation attributable to ‘Grandfather Blues’), what is so astonishing is the fact that history has had to be divided into two great eras: before and after the Beatles.
There has never been such a net division or watershed in terms of distance between ‘before’ and ‘after’. No-one played as they had, before. And, after, no-one played as they had before. «The release of each one of their albums» recalls Elvis Costello, sharing in the feeling of more than one generation of great artists «was a shock». In fact, a leap as big as this one had never been made before. And there hasn’t been one since.
Nor (unfortunately) will there ever be one. Not only because of the fact that, forty years after the four from Liverpool have split up, all the rooms of that famous ‘skyscraper’ have been lived in and furnished in every imaginable and unimaginable way (many of which have been fascinating), but above all because contemporary popular music (and especially the apple of her eye – the song) exhausted its own revolutionary potential, a long time ago, and it’s now become crystallised.

It’s not at all a co-incidence that a good seven of the top ten in “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time” (according to Rolling Stone magazine) were released in the sixties (four of these were Beatles’ albums – out of their thirteen LPs they’ve got ten in the top 500, of which five are in the top fifteen!). Nor is it a co-incidence that eleven of the top twenty of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” (once again according to Rolling Stone) were released in the sixties. A good four of these were by the Beatles, who have got nine in total amongst the top 100 (Elvis five, Dylan four and the Rolling Stones three, just to make things clearer), of which six are in the top thirty. The other decades have come out as follows: four amongst the best 500 belong to the ’50s, three to the ’70s, while the ’80s and ’90s have been judged with only one song each. It’s as if the ’50s represent the childhood of rock, the ’60s are its adolescence (with all its creative turbulence) and the ’70s its maturity. While everything that comes afterwards (apart from the rare exceptions, obviously) is nothing other than a gathering of the fruits of those precious seeds planted in those three extraordinarily fertile decades. It goes without saying that these classifications (however much, as in these two cases, they have been put together by artists, musicians, record labels, producers and specialised journalists) are always subject to a shower of (not completely unjustified) criticisms; but it’s obvious that «There’s no smoke without a fire»! Think about it, guys, just think about it.

 

Autobus e sottomarini

Avendo a che fare con una rubrica lunga un anno di dodici mesi e dovendo trattare di tredici album, ci siamo decisi a sistemare due dischi ritenuti ‘minori’ (usciti in realtà non di seguito) in un solo appuntamento. I due dischi sono entrambi legati a un film e rispondono ai titoli di Magical Mistery Tour e Yellow Submarine.

Sono lavori molto discussi: Magical Mistery Tour per la non certo esaltante qualità del film, anche se sul disco ci sono capolavori di indiscussa bellezza; l’altro perché, se è vero che il sottomarino giallo è un’icona del mondo psichedelico, la qualità del lavoro non è all’altezza di nessun album dei Fab Four. Se non altro perché ci sono canzoni – neanche troppo importanti – solamente su un lato, visto che il lato B è composto da musiche scritte e orchestrate da George Martin, come colonna sonora del film.

Quindi questa volta ci limiteremo a compilare una lista di brani, tratti dai due album, e a discuterne brevemente, anche perché fra i singoli usciti per conto loro e le varie versioni che sono state pubblicate di MMT c’è da fare davvero confusione!
A questo punto potremmo anche non sottolinearlo, ma “All You Need Is Love” uscì appena cinque settimane dopo Sgt. Pepper’s, e fu scritta sì e no un paio di giorni prima della diretta televisiva mondiale che la vide protagonista! Quando si cerca di sottolineare l’incredibile produzione compositiva della band è a questi particolari che si deve fare attenzione. Ma ecco i brani tratti dai due album.

1.    Magical Mystery Tour
2.    The Fool on the Hill
3.    Flying
4.    Blue Jay Way
5.    Your Mother Should Know
6.    I Am The Walrus
7.    Hello, Goodbye
8.    Baby, You’re a Rich Man
9.    All You Need Is Love
10.  Yellow Submarine
11.  Only a Northern Song
12.  All Together Now
13.  Hey Bulldog
14.  It’s All Too Much

Saranno due album non eccelsi, ma a farne uno solo non si sbaglia mica! Ci sono momenti altissimi di composizione e arrangiamento, come “I Am the Walrus”, “Hello Goodbye”, “The Fool on the Hill”, “All You Need Is Love”. La maggior parte dei musicisti del pianeta pagherebbe oro per avere uno solo di questi brani a nome proprio, ma in effetti questa volta servono due lavori per farne uno. Anche se in effetti nascevano come progetti paralleli ai film, quindi non c’era l’impegno totalizzante dei dischi ufficiali.
C’è chitarra, ma non sempre in vista, spesso nascosta da arrangiamenti di fiati, come sulla title track del primo film: il brano è un pezzo rock piuttosto tirato ma la chitarra ritmica che porta il tempo è nascosta nel mix. C’è invece chitarra per nulla nascosta su “Flying”: bella la prima che si ascolta, arricchita da un vibrato.
La ritmica acustica che porta il tempo su “Yellow Submarine” è in primissimo piano come quella su “All Together Now”: sono due brani leggeri che traggono vantaggio dalla presenza della sei corde acustica.
“Hey Bulldog” è un altro pezzo dal sapore piuttosto rock con un riff elettrico distorto che lo caratterizza, come l’assolo a metà del brano. “It’s All Too Much” sembra un brano di Jimi Hendrix se si ascolta l’inizio, suonato da una chitarra elettrica distorta che produce subito un poderoso feedback; elettrica che continua a suonare rispondendo e accompagnando la voce di Harrison. Se si escludono “Revolution #9”, “I Want You” e “Hey Jude”, è il brano più lungo mai apparso in un album dei Beatles.
“All You Need Is Love” ha un bell’assolo di chitarra elettrica, ma per il resto il brano è pieno di strumenti da orchestra che suonano tutte le parti più importanti.

Arrangiamenti
Sempre più va sottolineato come il grande lavoro di George Martin in fase di arrangiamento rendesse tutto splendidamente coeso: i quattro (soprattutto John e Paul, per ovvie ragioni) chiedevano cose apparentemente impossibili, aspettandosi sempre una pronta risposta sia per quanto riguardava i problemi tecnici che quelli musicali. Ma i loro strumenti originali erano sempre meno protagonisti nel sound complessivo, e se è vero che le loro menti spingevano per realizzare cose che ‘sentivano’ in testa ma non sapevano come mettere in pratica, è anche vero che senza il contributo del produttore molti di questi dischi non sarebbero esistiti, o avrebbero avuto forme del tutto differenti. Ognuno di loro sperimentava con strumenti nuovi, e va sottolineato che il valore delle linee di basso di Paul McCartney non è mai sceso sotto l’eccellenza: il suo suono era sempre più corposo grazie alle nuove tecniche di registrazione e il lirismo di molti passaggi dovrebbe essere studiato da chiunque si cimenti con questo strumento. Come tutti gli arrangiamenti, del resto, il pop come lo conosciamo oggi nasceva in quei mesi, in quegli anni, su quei dischi. Non c’è artificio o combinazione di strumenti che non sia stata sperimentata dai quattro, e con una povertà di mezzi tecnici impressionante; oggi qualunque ragazzo con un computer ha accesso a un numero migliaia di volte maggiore di possibilità… se solo fosse sufficiente a produrre capolavori!

Voci
Il discorso è simile a quello già affrontato nei capitoli precedenti: le voci sono trattate come veri e propri strumenti, ogni passaggio è incastrato alla perfezione negli spazi lasciati dall’orchestra o da chitarre, pianoforti, percussioni. Praticamente ogni brano è impreziosito da questo o quel coro, non ci si fa più caso, oramai è la prassi. E il meglio deve ancora arrivare.


I pensieri di Winston


di Davide Canazza

Magical Mystery Tour e Yellow Submarine sono sicuramente i dischi con meno chitarre nella storia dei Beatles. In quel periodo George Harrison suonava molto il sitar e stava trascurando il suo strumento principale. Ma una sera di maggio del 1967 gli capitò di assistere a un concerto di Jimi Hendrix e, dopo aver ascoltato cosa poteva uscire da una Stratocaster, decise che forse valeva la pena di riprendere in mano la chitarra.
Il risultato fu che il giorno dopo incise “It’s All Too Much”, brano con un’introduzione di chitarra in stile Hendrix con tanto di effetti feedback, suoni distorti e uso della leva del tremolo della sua Stratocaster Sonic Blue, che dopo pochi giorni avrebbe subìto la ormai famosa colorazione psichedelica e sarebbe stata ribattezzata ‘Rocky’.

La chitarra più utilizzata da Harrison in entrambi gli album è proprio la Fender Stratocaster, mentre Lennon rimane fedele alla sua Epiphone Casino. Dai filmati realizzati durante le session di “Hey Buldog” e “Lady Madonna” si può vedere che qui George usa la Gibson SG, chitarra in parte suonata anche da John. Sia dalle sequenze del filmato che dallo stile che emerge dall’ascolto, si potrebbe addirittura ipotizzare che sia proprio Lennon a suonare (con la SG) l’assolo di “Hey Buldog”.
Comunque sia, le chitarre torneranno a essere protagoniste delle registrazioni dei Beatles nel White Album, ma di questo parleremo tra un mese.


Manzoni vs. Lennon-McCartney


di Giuseppe Cesaro

Il mio professore di lettere del ginnasio raccontava con malcelato (e non del tutto ingiustificato) orgoglio che, se si fossero raccolti tutti i saggi pubblicati su I promessi sposi, si sarebbe riempito il Duomo di Milano. Beh, credo che per raccogliere quanto pubblicato a proposito dei Beatles, probabilmente non sarebbe sufficiente nemmeno il Maracanã.
Non che la quantità sia, necessariamente, sinonimo di qualità (anche i Bay City Rollers hanno venduto vagonate di dischi) ma è comunque un dato che fa riflettere. Nel caso dei Beatles (il più eclatante, ma certo non l’unico) qualità e quantità sono indissolubilmente legate da un rapporto causa-effetto: la seconda, infatti, dipende direttamente dalla prima.
Scrivere dei Beatles, dunque, è praticamente impossibile, se l’obiettivo è dire qualcosa di non detto, di nuovo, di originale. Se è questo che vi aspettate, fermatevi qui. Chi decide di proseguire lo fa a rischio di più di un déjà vu. Ciò che posso offrire è una riflessione che si sviluppa da angoli visuali non troppo frequentati. L’idea è quella di evidenziare e porre in relazione tra loro alcuni aspetti non propriamente ‘tecnici’, che hanno consentito agli ingredienti di legarsi in un modo unico e irripetibile e di dar vita al piatto più sorprendente, raffinato e nutriente della storia dell’arte culinaria rock. Che dire? Buon appetito!

Above… them… only sky…
Mettiamola così: se la musica rock fosse un grattacielo, il blues avrebbe scelto e acquistato il terreno e avviato il progetto, Elvis avrebbe ultimato il progetto e costruito il grattacielo, e i Beatles avrebbero aperto, arredato e abitato tutte le stanze, mostrandone al mondo ogni meraviglia.
Naturalmente, da allora ad oggi, gli ‘inquilini’ eccellenti che hanno vissuto in quel grattacielo – arricchendolo con la propria cultura, musicalità, sensibilità e tecnica – non si contano. Non faccio nomi: sarebbe impossibile. Non c’è spazio. E poi, ognuno ha la propria lista. I Fab Four, però, godono di una sorta di ‘ius primae notis‘ (nel senso di ‘nota’) che è valso loro il diritto di riservare per sé attico e superattico. I due piani più vicini a quell’empireo incantato nel quale le grandi idee abitano, in attesa che alcune anime particolarmente illuminate le captino, diano loro forma e le rendano visibili (nel nostro caso: udibili) ai comuni mortali, aiutandoli ad affrontare quella grandine di punti interrogativi senza risposta che chiamiamo esistenza.
Cosa c’è, dunque, di così tanto sconvolgente nel fenomeno Beatles? Quasi tutto. A ben guardare, infatti…

Prima di loro? Il diluvio!

Innanzitutto sconvolge il fatto che, parlando di musica popolare contemporanea (definizione nella quale, personalmente, includo qualunque filiazione musicale attribuibile a ‘nonno Blues’), la storia si debba dividere in due grandi ere: prima e dopo i Beatles.
Uno spartiacque così netto e così dirompente in termini di distanza tra il ‘prima’ e il ‘dopo’, non c’era mai stato. Niente suonava come loro, prima. E, dopo, niente suonava più come prima. «L’uscita di ogni loro album» ricorda Elvis Costello, facendo proprio il sentire di più di una generazione di grandi artisti «era uno shock». Un salto così, infatti, non c’era mai stato prima. E non c’è più stato nemmeno dopo.
Né (purtroppo) ci sarà mai più. Non solo per il fatto che, a quaranta anni dallo scioglimento dei quattro di Liverpool, tutte le stanze di quel famoso ‘grattacielo’ sono state vissute e arredate in tutti i modi immaginabili e inimmaginabili (molti dei quali, affascinanti), ma soprattutto perché la musica popolare contemporanea (e, in particolare, la sua creatura più fortunata: la ‘forma canzone’) ha, da tempo, esaurito la propria portata rivoluzionaria e si è, ormai, cristallizzata.

Non è affatto un caso che tra i primi dieci fra “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time” (secondo Rolling Stone) ben sette siano usciti negli anni ’60 (quattro di questi sono album dei Beatles, che dei loro tredici LP ne piazzano addirittura dieci nei primi cinquecento, di cui cinque nei primi quindici!). Così come non è un caso che undici delle prime venti tra “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” (sempre secondo Rolling Stone) siano uscite negli anni ’60. Ben quattro di queste sono firmate dai Beatles, che ne piazzano nove nelle prime cento (Elvis cinque, Dylan quattro e i Rolling Stones tre, tanto per capirci), di cui sei nelle prime trenta. Le altre decadi risultano così accreditate: quattro tra le migliori cinquecento appartengono agli anni ’50, tre agli anni ’70, mentre anni ’80 e ’90 si ‘aggiudicano’ una sola canzone ciascuno. È come se gli anni ‘50 rappresentassero la fanciullezza del rock, gli anni ’60 l’adolescenza (con tutte le sue turbolenze creative) e i ’70 la maturità. Mentre tutto quello che viene dopo (a parte qualche rara eccezione, s’intende) non sembra altro che un raccogliere i frutti dei semi pregiati piantati in quelle tre decadi straordinariamente fertili. Va da sé che queste classifiche (per quanto, in questi due casi, redatte da artisti, musicisti, discografici, produttori e giornalisti specializzati) sono sempre soggette a una valanga di critiche (non tutte infondate); ma è chiaro – come recita un proverbio inglese – che «Non c’è fumo, senza fuoco»! Meditate, gente, meditate.

 

...sull'Autore

Related Posts

  1. Gabriele Longo Reply

    Complimenti ragazzi! Le considerazioni, le ottiche inedite, le parafrasi, e le immagini espresse in questi vostri contributi mi trovano pienamente d’accordo!! La spudorata, geniale grandezza compositiva, e di conseguenza l’altrettanto sorprendente capacità esecutiva della loro musica non può certo prescindere dal tempo storico in cui fu immaginata e realizzata. Il mondo spingeva con una forza propulsiva eccezionale e loro furono i catalizzatori di tale energia. Non a caso dal decennio degli Ottanta in avanti, col graduale venire meno di tali forze positive, fino allo squallido ripiegamento dell’oggi, la “pesante” leggerezza di quel tipo di composizioni rimane per le nostre generazioni un traguardo inarrivabile… Confidiamo nella rivalsa delle coscienze da cui scaturisca un nuovo rinascimento!!!

Lascia il tuo commento

*

Captcha * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.