Un anno di Beatles – 10

«Happiness is a warm gun»

The Beatles, even called ‘The White Album’, is by many considered the most significant work, the one many of us bring in the heart, for several reasons. We could start from that wonderful, immaculate cover, all white with the band’s name slightly raised and in white too, invisible at a first glance. We don’t know if it was the first time for something like this, it has been the most famous, for sure.

After Sgt. Pepper’s formalism and the less loved Magical Mistery Tour, the ‘White Album’ is a work that swerves sharply from many of the rules established in previous years: the four doesn’ t work always together, they’re often at work at the same time in different studios; who wrote the song sings it and many times decide everything about it; poor Ringo is forced to play hundreds of times the same part or to a long waiting in the corridors for someone to decide they need him, arriving to quit the band for a short time; the four fight furiously for futile reasons proving mutual impatience due to years of close contacts, closed to the outside world; Yoko Ono appears next to John in the studio, she won’t leave him until the end. George Martin is not the only one producing the band and the guys, instead of rehearsing and then recording, record everything, the result is a huge amount of tapes for each song.
And what about the fades that tie almost every song to the next one? A whole side of Abbey Road will be built like that.
These elements lead to a masterpiece of unparalleled beauty.
If the word ‘versatility’ ever had a meaning in music, it could really be what’s inside this record.
As if that were not enough, we can add the 45 rpm “Hey Jude/Revolution” to the amazing quality and variety of the elements. This time we won’t insert the single in the album as usual in our game at this point, but we’ll cite it as if it was part of it.
The great track-list (we left the four sides of the LPs) is the one that follows:

Side one
1.         “Back in the USSR”
2.         “Dear Prudence”
3.         “Glass Onion”
4.         “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da”
5.         “Wild Honey Pie”
6.         “The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill”
7.         “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” (Harrison)
8.         “Happiness Is A Warm Gun”

Side two
1.         “Martha My Dear”
2.         “I’m So Tired”
3.         “Blackbird”
4.         “Piggies” (Harrison)
5.         “Rocky Raccoon”
6.         “Don’t Pass Me By” (Starkey)
7.         “Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?”
8.         “I Will”
9.         “Julia”

Side three
1.         “Birthday”
2.         “Yer Blues”
3.         “Mother Nature’s Son”
4.         “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey”
5.         “Sexy Sadie”
6.         “Helter Skelter”
7.         “Long, Long, Long” (Harrison)

Side four
1.         “Revolution 1”
2.         “Honey Pie”
3.         “Savoy Truffle” (Harrison)
4.         “Cry Baby Cry”
5.         “Revolution 9”
6.         “Good Night”

If we consider opposites as Paul’s rough “Helter Skelter” or the mellow “Mother Nature’s Son”, John’s edgy “Revolution” or the sweet “Julia”, passing from extremes like “Back in the USSR” and “Martha My Dear”, or “Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except Me and My Monkey” and “I’m So Tired”, we realize what is needed to be the best band ever. And we cited just a few examples, leaving out a lot more. The white album comes almost a whole year after the last work, but it’s double and the long time is already justified by this.
It’s like if the boys went back on the road, to their r’n’r beginnings, songs like “Back in the USSR” and “Birthday” are fast and furios in their way; “Helter Skelter” and “Yer Blues” open new roads followed in years by hard rock and blues bands of any kind; “Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?” features Paul in of the hottest performances ever; on the other side, “I Will” and “Blackbird” (but not just those) are among the sweetest ballads ever written, often recorded in the same recording session of a fast, rough tune.
Speaking of composition we find unknown masterpieces like “I’m So Tired” and “Sexy Sadie”, united by a bold major chord that goes down a half tone at the beginning of the verse, or the wonderful “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” , originally three unfinished songs that Lennon was able to fuse into a single masterpiece.
None of them was any longer afraid of something, no difference between the elements, they used almost anything: from the fans sitting in front of the studios, recruited to sing a verse that needed female vocals, to the stairwell used to create a natural ‘reverb’ effect. The only boundary was their fantasy or the often insurmountable technical problems of the time.
A tiny room with the whole band inside recording “Yer Blues”, each thing happened by chance as a glass vibrating to a certain note, everything was recorded and used.
Did we mention “Hey Jude” and the violent version of “Revolution”? There’s no need, they’re masterpieces out of time!

Electric guitar
If guitar almost disappeared from Sgt. Pepper’s, here’s the four going back to the roots, dusting off the six strings and adding exaggerated distorsions for the time, they sent to red all the desk channels to saturate sounds as in “Revolution”. Davide Canazza will go deeper in his own way in the subject, let’s just mention a few things.
We must be honest: what is going to be remembered first is Eric Clapton’ solo on Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, George had tried any kind of solution but in the end he ask his friend to play on the song. Lucky us he did it, the beauty of the tune, combined with the intensity of the solo, gave us a memorable performance.
But there’s plenty of quality electrics in the album, each of the rock’n’roll mentioned before guitar is the main instrument, we went back to the beginnings but with the maturity of the navigated musicians, this is one of the best summaries of their musical life. And what about “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey” and “Sexy Sadie”, two gems, especially the latter, full of electric guitar’s riffs, solos, whatever?

Acoustic guitar
It was probably during their trip to India that Donovan taught John how to use the alternating bass with the right hand’s thumb, John didn’t miss a chance to write the poignant ballad dedicated to his too-young dead mother, “Julia”, and the main riff of “Dear Prudence”, this song was related to India too, as if it was probably dedicated to Prudence Farrow, Mia’ sister, both meditation partners in the foreign country. Even “Sexy Sadie” dedicated to their spiritual guidance, the Maharishi Maesh Yogi, comes from that experience.
And there’s plenty of acoustic in Paul’s hands, he gives us gems like “Blackbird” and “Mother Nature’s Son”, small masterpieces born along the lines of “Yesterday”, with him using bare fingers and the six strings to play intense and unforgettable moments.

Arrangements
The times of a single-day recording session for an album are just memories, at the beginning they were under pressure because of the continuous tours and of the promotion work that seemed to never end, other than studios were not cheap. Now they’re the most famous musicians of the planet, free from any kind of commitment than being in the studio to create and record the new album, and the studios were almost home, nobody would have dreamed of asking them to leave because others needed it! Here they could afford to use hundreds of tapes, most of whom would have been useless, instead of rehearsing somewhere else and get in the studio with the arrangements done. As mentioned, comparing the huge work done on Sgt. Pepper’s, the white album is kind of going back to simplicity, many songs work because of the band backbone, bass and drums with the guitars to fill the spaces; some songs are made almost only of acoustic guitars; what is becoming increasingly clear is how George Martin’s orchestrations went to overlap perfectly with the work of the group, going to compensate where the Beatles would not have arrived with their skills, showing that he was indeed the ‘fifth Beatle’. On “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” they have no problem in going from a 4/4 time to a 3/4 and back, many songs seem almost obvious in their simplicity, but each mechanism works perfectly, Ringo never misses a fill and the end result has been there for all to see, for a long time.

Vocals
From the ’50’s style back vocals of “Back in the USSR” to the perfect joints of “Happiness Is a Warm Gun”, from the nice vocal pads of “Rocky Raccoon” to John’s amazing double vocals on “Hey Jude”, we find “Sexy Sadie”, full of small but precious vocals, a trademark of theirs that changed the course of pop music forever.


Winston’s Thoughts


by Davide Canazza

The record begins with a jam session that saw Jerry Lee Lewis on piano, Elvis on vocals and The Beach Boys on backing vocals… Not true! On “Back in the USSR” there were only Paul McCartney (vocals, drums, lead guitar and piano), John Lennon (bass, drums and vocals) and George Harrison (rhythm guitar and backing vocals). Ringo was on holyday. McCartney’s guitar solo is simply – literally talking – wonderful.
Guitars and guitarists are the stars again in this album. New musical instruments for all: the legendary Harrison’s Gibson Les Paul known as ‘Lucy’ (first belonged to John Sebastian, then to Clapton who gave it to George as a present); John’s and Paul’s Martin D-28s; Harrison’s Gibson J–200, the Fender Bass VI for emergencies…
Talking about amps we can find a full hegemony of Fenders: a brand Deluxe Reverb Silverface for Harrison joins the faithful Blonde Bassman and a Blackface Deluxe Amp for John.
Let’s return to music. For the recording of the album, the Beatles found themselves often at work simultaneously in the three Abbey Road’s studios, and each of the other three were forced to contend the presence of Ringo on drums.
It happened so that Lennon, Harrison, McCartney were forced to exchange their roles or that a song was left in stand by waiting for George’s solo or Paul’s bass, or backing vocals.
As in the past, many guitar solos were played by McCartney, but now even Lennon plays a good share of solos, always in his own songs. He plays the fuzzy guitar on “Happiness Is a Warm Gun”; by Lennon is also the first solo of “Yer Blues”, while the second one is played by Harrison (even if in the back it’s possible to listen to the original second solo played by John and further overdubbed).
Lennon plays the guitar solo in the end of “Sexy Sadie” and the fuzzy overdriven lead guitar in “Revolution” (single version), whose sound is obtained by passing through a fuzz connected directly to the mixing console.
Paul plays the guitar solo on “Back in the USSR” and “Honey Pie”, while on “Helter Skelter” he was on rhythm guitar and he played the descending phrasing of the introduction and after George’s main solo.
Harrison, as well as in the two songs already mentioned, performs the guitar solo in “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except for Me and My Monkey”, “Revolution 1” and “Savoy Truffle”.
Finally, let’s talk about “Birthday”, a song written by Paul in one go, with the help of John and George. Here Lennon’s and Harrison’s guitars are rhythm and lead at the same time. Riffs are played simultaneously in two different octaves: John plays the lower, George the higher. The closing instrumental parts after the instrumental verse are played in unison by the two guitarists.
A song recorded the old way, with all the four Beatles in studio simultaneously! For the record, between the recordings of rhythm parts and overdubs (solo parts, keyboards and vocals) the four Beatles and the technician Chris Thomas took a break to watch on TV (at Paul’s), the film The Girl Can’t Help It!.
That evening, rock’n’roll was in the air!


I Saw The Beatles Live – 4


By Dennis Conroy

4. The Beatles looked great
The look they had adopted after trips to Hamburg did make them stand out in provincial Liverpool of the early sixties. Favouring black and whether contrived or not, they looked like a unit.
Paul had that baby faced assassin look, John friendly but edgy.
George looked too young to be as good as he was, more like a kid brother in the group.
I remember the Beatles appearing at the Cavern around the date of Paul’s twentieth birthday. A cake with candles was taken on the stage and after the “Happy Birthday” celebrations quietened down George, in his droll way informed us all, that he was ‘the only teenage Beatle now’. As the majority of people in the place were teenagers George established he was still one of us.
Pete Best was a film star, or so he looked. Undoubtedly he was the most popular Beatle amongst the girl fans. A fact I felt did not sit too well with John and Paul, with Pete frequently being the victim of their humour. They would often announce Pete would sing the next song, which would invariably bring squeals of expectation from the girls. Pete would lower his head in a shy James Dean way as they laughed and launched into a number featuring one of them. However I am assured by Bill Kinsley, of the Merseybeats, that Pete did very occasionally sing, although I did not get to see that myself.

5. The Beatles were unbelievably exciting
The Beatles would amble on to the stage ignoring the audience as they made slight adjustments to the already set up drums and amplifiers. Paul would feed his guitar lead underneath one of his Cuban heeled boots to remove any kinks from it before plugging into his amplifier.
Careful not to make too much noise Pete would set his snare drum in place before glancing up at the frontline. From left to right George, Paul and John, ignoring the audience would be involved in some lively, mainly unintelligible banter while we… looked on in anticipation. One of the front three would, part un-noticed, turn away to make, what we assumed was, a final alteration to an amplifier.
Then it would happen. At an obviously pre-arranged signal, perhaps a mimed count in or a 1, 2, 3, 4 stamp of a Cuban heel, the Beatles would rip into their opening number. We were always caught by surprise. These intros were a feature of their stage show.
They always engaged with the audience. Reading request written on scraps of paper, sharing jokes. They were extremely humorous without descending into contrived cabaret. John was particularly funny, but more of that later.
While a request was being read out by Paul or as John joked with the audience, secret preparation for the next song was taking place. As whatever was being said concluded, the hidden count in was there for the Beatles to surprise us once again.
Further excitement was generated by the pace and dynamics the Beatles crafted into their music. The out and out rock numbers were played faster and with more drive than Little Richard, Elvis and Chuck’s originals. Once again the Beatles surprised us all by injecting that extra pace into tracks that, although well known to us, now had that unique Beatles stamp on them.
They added dynamics to songs like “To Know Her Is To Love Her. The energy and lift they injected in to the middle eight was certainly not there in the Teddy Bears original wonderful recording.

6. They could write a decent tune
The Beatles reputation locally was based on many things but not, as may be assumed, on their song writing. They had a huge and varied repertoire which was added to by a few of their own compositions. Those I can recall hearing them play were, “Love Me Do”, “P.S. I Love You”, “Please Please Me” and “The Tip of My Tongue”. It came as a great but very welcome surprise when the first album release had eight original songs on it. The rest as they say is history.
Back in those Cavern days “P.S. I Love You” was a huge favourite with the girls but also won the admiration of the male followers. This was because this group who came from similar backgrounds to us were writing their own songs. Up until then we thought you had to be a ‘real’ musician chosen by God to compose songs in the ‘Brill Building’ or ‘Tin Pan Alley’ or a concert hall. But no ‘our mates’ did it because they could.
“P.S. I Love You” was the song everyone one expected to be the A-side when we discovered the Beatles were going to make a record. “Love Me Do” had a bit more edge to it and was certainly a worthy choice for the A-side of their debut single which, incidentally, I bought the first morning it was released.
“Please Please Me” was played a lot slower at the Cavern with George playing the octave riff and no harmonica. The «Come on, come on» refrain and that fabulous middle eight leading you back into the opening lines of the song set it aside as something really special.
“The Tip of My Tongue”, which was a single for Tommy Quickly, was memorable, if my memory serves me right, for John playing the maracas. It certainly wasn’t played anywhere near as often as the other originals by the group at the Cavern.
So if you have or know anyone who has the six ingredients…
Next: what they played, how they played, who they played with, what they said.

(4 – to be continued)

«Happiness is a warm gun»

The Beatles, detto ‘The White Album’, è da molti considerato il lavoro più significativo, quello che tanti di noi portano nel cuore, per diversi motivi. Potremmo iniziare proprio da quella meravigliosa, immacolata copertina, tutta bianca con il nome del gruppo in rilievo, bianco anche lui, invisibile a un primo sguardo. Non sappiamo se fosse la prima volta che si faceva qualcosa di simile, ma di sicuro fu la più celebre.

Dopo il formalismo di Sgt. Pepper’s e il meno amato Magical Mistery Tour, il ‘Doppio Bianco’ è un lavoro che sterza bruscamente da molte delle regole stabilite negli anni precedenti: i quattro non lavorano più solo insieme, spesso sono addirittura al lavoro simultaneamente in studi diversi; chi ha scritto il brano lo canta e molte volte decide quasi tutto ciò che lo riguarda; il povero Ringo è costretto a suonare centinaia di volte la stessa parte o ad aspettare nei corridoi che qualcuno decida che c’è bisogno di lui, arrivando anche a lasciare la band; i quattro litigano furiosamente per i motivi più futili dimostrando un’insofferenza reciproca data da anni di contatti strettissimi, chiusi al mondo esterno; Yoko Ono fa la sua comparsa al fianco di John in studio e non lo lascerà più. George Martin non è più l’unico produttore del gruppo e i quattro invece di provare, e poi registrare, registrano qualsiasi cosa, trovandosi fra le mani una quantità impressionante di nastri.
E che dire delle dissolvenze fra i vari brani che li legano quasi tutti uno all’altro? Un intero lato di Abbey Road beneficerà in maniera anche maggiore di questa tecnica di missaggio.
Questo porta a un capolavoro di ineguagliabile bellezza.
Se la parola ‘versatilità’ ha mai avuto un significato in musica, potrebbe davvero essere ciò che è contenuto in questo album.
Come se non bastasse, alla straordinaria qualità e varietà di elementi si aggiunge il singolo “Hey Jude/Revolution” che questa volta, prendendoci una nuova, piccola libertà, non inseriremo nell’album ma citeremo come facente parte di esso.
La grandiosa track-list (abbiamo lasciato le quattro facciate originali dell’LP) è quella che segue:

Side one
1.         “Back in the USSR”
2.         “Dear Prudence”
3.         “Glass Onion”
4.         “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da”
5.         “Wild Honey Pie”
6.         “The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill”
7.         “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” (Harrison)
8.         “Happiness Is A Warm Gun”

Side two
1.         “Martha My Dear”
2.         “I’m So Tired”
3.         “Blackbird”
4.         “Piggies” (Harrison)
5.         “Rocky Raccoon”
6.         “Don’t Pass Me By” (Starkey)
7.         “Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?”
8.         “I Will”
9.         “Julia”

Side three
1.         “Birthday”
2.         “Yer Blues”
3.         “Mother Nature’s Son”
4.         “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey”
5.         “Sexy Sadie”
6.         “Helter Skelter”
7.         “Long, Long, Long” (Harrison)

Side four
1.         “Revolution 1”
2.         “Honey Pie”
3.         “Savoy Truffle” (Harrison)
4.         “Cry Baby Cry”
5.         “Revolution 9”
6.         “Good Night”

Se si considerano opposti come la violenta “Helter Skelter” e la morbida “Mother Nature’s Son” di Paul o la graffiante “Revolution” e la dolcissima “Julia” di John, passando per estremi come “Back in the USSR” e “Martha My Dear”, o “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey” e “I’m So Tired”, ci si rende davvero conto di cosa sia necessario per essere la più grande band di sempre. E abbiamo citato solo alcune canzoni, lasciando fuori molto altro. L’album bianco arriva a quasi un anno di distanza dall’ultimo lavoro, ma è doppio e il tempo passato si giustifica già così.
È come se i ragazzi fossero tornati in strada, al rock’n’roll delle origini, brani come “Back in the USSR” e “Birthday” sono tiratissimi, alla loro maniera; “Helter Skelter” e “Yer Blues” aprono strade nuove percorse negli anni da band di blues e hard-rock di ogni tipo; “Why Don’t We Do It in the Road?” vede una performance vocale di McCartney catalogabile come una delle più sensuali della storia; all’estremo opposto, “I Will” e “Blackbird” (ma non solo queste) sono fra le ballate più morbide mai scritte, spesso registrate a distanza di una sola seduta da cose violentissime.
Dal punto di vista compositivo ci sono capolavori sconosciuti a molti come “I’m So Tired” e “Sexy Sadie”, accomunati da un audace accordo maggiore che scende di mezzo tono ad inizio strofa, o la bellissima “Happiness Is a Warm Gun”, tre canzoni incompiute che Lennon riuscì a fondere in un singolo capolavoro.
Nessuno di loro aveva più paura di nulla, non c’era differenza fra gli elementi, si usava qualsiasi cosa: dalle ragazze in strada che facevano la posta davanti agli studi, reclutate per cantare un coro che necessitava di voci femminili, alla tromba delle scale per creare un effetto di ‘riverbero’ naturale. L’unico limite era quello della loro fantasia e dei problemi tecnici spesso insormontabili per l’epoca. Una stanza minuscola con loro chiusi dentro a registrare “Yer Blues”, ogni cosa capitata per caso, come un bicchiere che vibrava a una certa nota suonata, veniva registrata e utilizzata.
Abbiamo detto di “Hey Jude” e della violenta versione di “Revolution”? Non crediamo ce ne sia davvero bisogno, capolavori senza tempo!

Chitarra elettrica
Se la chitarra era quasi scomparsa da Sgt. Pepper’s, ecco che i quattro tornano all’antico, rispolverando le fide sei corde e aggiungendo distorsioni esagerate per l’epoca, facendo saturare i banchi di Abbey Road come nel caso di “Revolution”. Davide Canazza approfondirà alla sua maniera il tema chitarra, qui accenniamo qualcosa.
Siamo onesti: ciò che rimarrà nella storia in quanto a chitarra elettrica è di sicuro il solo di Eric Clapton su “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” di Harrison, che aveva provato senza successo con nastri al contrario e quant’altro, ma alla fine chiese all’amico Eric di suonare lui. E per fortuna che lo fece, la bellezza della canzone, unita all’intensità dell’assolo, ci hanno regalato una performance memorabile.
Ma le elettriche sono abbondanti e di qualità in tutto il lavoro, su ognuno dei rock’n’roll sopra citati la chitarra la fa da padrona, siamo tornati agli esordi ma con la maturità dei musicisti navigati, questa è una delle migliori sintesi della loro vita musicale.
E che dire di “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey” e “Sexy Sadie”, due gemme compositive, soprattutto la seconda, anche queste piene di suoni di chitarra elettrica, riff, assoli, qualsiasi cosa?

Chitarra acustica
Durante il viaggio in India pare che Donovan avesse insegnato la tecnica americana del basso alternato sulla chitarra acustica a John, che non si fece scappare l’occasione di scriverci la struggente ballata dedicata alla madre scomparsa, “Julia”, unica canzone della loro storia che vede John in completa solitudine, e il riff portante di “Dear Prudence”, anche questa legata all’India, visto che doveva trattarsi di Prudence Farrow, sorella dell’attrice Mia Farrow, loro compagne di meditazione nel paese straniero. La stessa “Sexy Sadie”, rivolta al maestro spirituale, il Maharishi Maesh Yogi, nasce da quell’esperienza.
E c’è tanta acustica nelle mani di Paul che si produce in gemme come “Blackbird” e “Mother Nature’s Son”, piccoli capolavori nati sulla falsariga di “Yesterday”, con il nostro che usa le sole dita e le sei corde per regalarci momenti intensi e indimenticabili.

Arrangiamenti
Sono oramai lontani i tempi in cui i quattro entravano in sala e registravano un disco in poche ore, allora erano sotto pressione a causa dei tour ininterrotti e del lavoro di promozione che sembrava non finire mai, oltre al fatto che gli studi costavano. A questo punto si trattava invece dei musicisti più famosi del pianeta, liberi da ogni tipo di impegno se non quello di stare in studio a creare e registrare il nuovo disco, e gli studi erano praticamente casa loro, nessuno si sarebbe sognato di chiedergli di andarsene perché altri ne avevano bisogno! Ecco che ci si poteva permettere di usare centinaia di nastri, la maggior parte dei quali sarebbe risultata inutile, invece di provare da qualche altra parte e arrivare in studio con le idee più chiare. Come già accennato, rispetto al grande lavoro fatto su Sgt. Pepper’s, l’album bianco è una sorta di ritorno alla semplicità, molti brani funzionano grazie all’ossatura della band, basso e batteria con chitarre a riempire il tutto; diversi brani si reggono quasi solo sulle chitarre acustiche; quello che appare sempre più evidente è come le orchestrazioni di George Martin si andassero a sovrapporre perfettamente al lavoro del gruppo, andando a compensare dove i Beatles non sarebbero arrivati con i loro mezzi, dimostrando come lui fu davvero il ‘quinto beatle’. Su “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” non hanno nessun problema a passare più di una volta da un tempo di 4/4 a uno di 3/4, molte canzoni sembrano quasi scontate nella loro semplicità, ma ogni meccanismo funziona perfettamente, Ringo non sbaglia un passaggio e alla fine il risultato è sotto gli occhi di tutti, da molto tempo.

Voci
Dai cori stile anni ’50 di “Back in the USSR” ai perfetti incastri di “Happiness Is a Warm Gun”, dal tappeto vocale su “Rocky Raccoon” alla splendida seconda voce di Lennon e tutti i cori su “Hey Jude”, si arriva a quella “Sexy Sadie” piena di piccoli ma preziosi interventi, un loro marchio di fabbrica che ha segnato il corso del pop per sempre.


I pensieri di Winston


di Davide Canazza

Il disco inizia con una jam session che vede Jerry Lee Lewis al piano, Elvis alla voce e i Beach Boys a fare il coro… Non è vero, in “Back in the USSR” ci sono solo Paul McCartney (voce, batteria, chitarra solista e piano), John Lennon (basso, batteria e cori) e George Harrison (chitarra ritmica e cori). Ringo era in vacanza. L’assolo di McCartney è semplicemente (in senso letterale) meraviglioso.
Le chitarre e i chitarristi tornano protagonisti in questo album. Nuovi strumenti per tutti: la leggendaria Gibson Les Paul ‘Lucy’ di Harrison (appartenuta prima a John Sebastian, poi a Clapton che la regalò a George) le Martin D-28 di John e Paul, la Gibson J-200 di Harrison, il Fender Bass VI da usare come jolly…
Sul versante ampli si entra in piena egemonia Fender: un nuovo Deluxe Reverb Silverface per Harrison da affiancare al fedele Bassman Blonde e un Deluxe Amp Blackface per John.
Torniamo alla musica. Per la registrazione dell’album, i Beatles si ritrovarono spesso a lavorare contemporaneamente nei tre studi di Abbey Road, e ognuno degli altri tre era obbligato a contendersi Ringo per le parti di batteria. Capitava così che Lennon, Harrison e McCartney si scambiassero i ruoli o che il pezzo venisse lasciato in sospeso in attesa dell’assolo di George o del basso di Paul, o dei cori di tutti e quattro.
Come già in passato, molte chitarre soliste sono di McCartney, ma anche Lennon si guadagna una buona fetta di assoli, sempre in pezzi da lui composti. Sua è la chitarra con fuzz di “Happiness Is a Warm Gun”; suo il primo assolo di “Yer Blues”, mentre il secondo è di Harrison (ma in sottofondo si sente anche l’originario secondo solo di John).
Il solo nel finale di “Sexy Sadie” è sempre di Lennon e sempre sua è la distortissima chitarra solista in “Revolution” (versione 45 giri), il cui suono è ottenuto passando attraverso un fuzz collegato direttamente alla console del mixer.
Paul è alla chitarra solista in “Back in the USSR” e “Honey Pie”, mentre in “Helter Skelter” suona la ritmica e il fraseggio discendente dell’introduzione, ripreso poi anche dopo l’assolo centrale di George.
Harrison, oltre che nei due brani già citati, esegue le parti di chitarra solista anche in “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except for Me and My Monkey”, “Revolution 1” e in “Savoy Truffle”.
E poi c’è “Birthday”, una canzone scritta da Paul di getto, con il contributo di John e George. Qui le chitarre di Lennon e Harrison sono entrambe ritmiche e soliste, col riff suonato in contemporanea dai due su ottave differenti: John quella bassa, George quella alta. Anche le parti di chiusura alle strofa strumentale sono suonate all’unisono dai due chitarristi.
Un pezzo inciso alla vecchia maniera, con tutti e quattro i Beatles presenti contemporaneamente! Per la cronaca, tra la registrazione delle parti ritmiche e le sovraincisioni di completamento (parti soliste, tastiere e voci) i quattro e il tecnico Chris Thomas si presero una pausa per vedere in TV (a casa di Paul) il film The Girl Can’t Help It!.
Il rock’n’roll, quella sera, era nell’aria!


Ho visto i Beatles dal vivo – 4


di Dennis Conroy

4. I Beatles avevano un gran look
Il look che avevano adottato dopo i viaggi ad Amburgo li faceva brillare nella Liverpool provinciale dei primi anni ’60. Preferivano il nero e, artificiosi o meno, apparivano come un’unità.
Paul aveva quella faccia da baby-killer, John appariva amichevole ma tagliente.
George sembrava troppo giovane per essere così bravo, sembrava il fratellino che si portavano in giro.
Mi ricordo i Beatles al Cavern in occasione del ventesimo compleanno di Paul. Una torta con le candeline fu portata sul palco e una volta terminato il consueto ‘tanti auguri a te’, George, nella sua maniera divertente di dire le cose, ci informò che l’unico teenager dei Beatles rimasto era lui. Visto che la maggior parte di quelli fra il pubblico erano teenagers, era il suo modo per dirci che era ancora uno di noi.
Pete Best era una star da film, o almeno sembrava esserlo. Era indubbiamente il Beatle più popolare fra le ragazze. Credo che non fosse un fatto da sottovalutare, visto che cadeva spesso sotto i colpi del tagliente umorismo di John e Paul. Spesso annunciavano, fra le urla piene di aspettativa delle ragazze, che Pete avrebbe cantato la canzone seguente, partendo poi invariabilmente con una delle loro canzoni, mentre Pete abbassava lo sguardo timidamente alla maniera di James Dean, con gli altri che ridevano. Il mio amico Billy Kinsley dei Merseybeats mi ha assicurato che Pete in qualche occasione cantò, anche se non mi capitò mai di vederlo.

5. I Beatles erano incredibilmente eccitanti
I Beatles salivano lentamente sul palco ignorando la gente, facendo piccoli aggiustamenti agli strumenti già posizionati. Paul tirava il jack della chitarra con il tacco di uno dei suoi stivaletti cubani per togliere possibili nodi formatisi prima di inserirlo nell’amplificatore.
Attento a non fare troppo rumore, Pete sistemava il rullante prima di alzare lo sguardo al fronte del palco. Da sinistra a destra George, Paul e John, ignorando il pubblico, erano parte di qualche inascoltabile scherzo fra di loro mentre noi… guardavamo in attesa. Uno dei tre, senza dare nell’occhio, si girava per fare la modifica finale ad uno degli ampli.
Poi accadeva. Con un segnale chiaramente preparato, forse un conteggio silenzioso o un 1, 2, 3, 4 dato da uno stivale sul palco, i Beatles si lanciavano nel numero di apertura. Eravamo sempre colti di sorpresa. Quelle intro erano un classico dei loro concerti.
Erano sempre impegnati con la gente, leggevano richieste scarabocchiate su foglietti, o facevano battute. Erano estremamente divertenti senza essere mai volgari. John aveva un gran senso dell’humour, ci torno più avanti.
Mentre Paul leggeva una richiesta o John scherzava con qualcuno, avveniva la segreta preparazione del pezzo successivo. Qualunque fosse la cosa che era appena terminata, iniziava subito un nuovo brano, contato in segreto per sorprenderci ancora.
Ulteriori eccitazione era generata dal ritmo e dalla dinamica con cui i Beatles costruivano la loro musica. I rock’n’roll venivano suonati più velocemente e con più drive degli originali di Little Richard, Elvis e Chuck Berry. Ancora una volta i Beatles ci sorprendevano tutti, mettendo quel qualcosa in più in tracce che, anche se ben note a tutti noi, avevano ora il timbro dei Beatles ben impresso.
Aggiungevano dinamica a brani come “To Know Her Is To Love Her”. L’energia che iniettavano nella parte centrale non era certo presente nella pur splendida versione originale.

6. Sapevano scrivere una canzone decente
La loro reputazione era basata all’epoca su molte cose ma non, come si potrebbe pensare, sulla loro capacità di scrivere. Avevano un repertorio vasto e vario con qualche sporadica aggiunta di brani originali. Ricordo di averli sentiti suonare “Love Me Do”, “P.S. I Love You”, “Please Please Me” e “The Tip of My Tongue”. Fu una inaspettata e gradita sorpresa quando uscì il primo album con ben otto originali. Il resto è, come si suol dire, storia.
Ai tempi del Cavern “P.S. I Love You” era una delle preferite dalle ragazze, ma conquistò anche molti dei ragazzi. Ciò perché questo gruppo di ragazzi proveniente dalla nostra stessa realtà scriveva le proprie canzoni. Fino a quel momento credevamo che si dovesse essere un ‘vero’ musicista scelto da Dio per comporre nel ‘Brill Building’ o a ‘Tin Pan Alley’ o in una sala da concerto. Ma nessuno dei ‘nostri amici’ lo fece perché loro potevano.
“P.S. I Love You” era la canzone che tutti ci saremmo aspettati come lato A di un singolo quando scoprimmo che i Beatles stavano per fare un disco. “Love Me Do” era di certo più forte e adatta ad essere il lato A per un singolo di debutto, singolo che io comprai la mattina stessa che uscì.
“Please Please Me” al Cavern era suonata molto più lenta, con George che suonava il riff ad ottave e senza armonica. Il ritornello «Come on, come on» e quella favolosa parte centrale che riportavano sui versi iniziali la rendevano davvero speciale.
“The Tip of My Tongue”, che divenne un singolo di Tommy Quickly, fu memorabile, se la memoria mi aiuta, per John che suonava le maracas. Non era certo suonata quanto gli altri originali in quel periodo del Cavern.
Quindi, se avete o conoscete qualcuno che abbia i sei ingredienti…
Prossimamente: cosa suonavano, come lo suonavano, con chi suonavano, cosa dicevano.

(4 – continua)

...sull'Autore

Related Posts

  1. Zed Reply

    “If guitar almost disappeared from Sgt. Pepper’s…”

    What on earth are you talking about? Sgt. Pepper is filled with electric guitar riffs all and yummy guitar sounds almost all the way through. Guitar did not disappear at all. Maybe you were so distracted by listening to all the other cool instruments on Sgt. Pepper that you forgot that guitars were still the primary instrument on almost every song?

  2. alecb Reply

    C’era una volta un ragazzino di 14-15 anni che viveva in mezzo a chitarre di ogni tipo e forma senza interessarsi di quello che una chitarra ti può dare. Il padre del ragazzino, un giorno (un bel giorno) infilò una cassetta VHS nel lettore. Era un concerto “unplugged” di Paul e la sua band (Linda era pure partecipe).

    Il ragazzino prese in mano la chitarra più vicina e chiese a suo padre come si facesse a suonare. Dopo 2 mesi o poco più “Blackbird” non aveva più segreti… La magia della musica di Paul e della chitarra era entrata in lui per poi non uscirne più.

    Ma forse la magia stava non tanto nella chitarra in sé, ma nell’emozione provata nell’ascoltare quei brani tanto semplici (?!?) ma tanto coinvolgenti. Roba che se ti entra dentro non ti abbandonerà mai più.

    Vedere che, dopo tanti anni, la Loro musica riesce ancora a fare proseliti è una soddisfazione enorme, ancor più se il padre del ragazzino è colui che sta commentando ora.

    Questi quattro mi hanno accompagnato in gioventù, stanno accompagnando un’altra generazione e forse accompagneranno anche le successive. Musica, composizioni, genialità, intuizioni penso irripetibili. Mi ritengo fortunato ad essere vecchio ed ad aver vissuto tutto questo.

    Ed anche un grazie di cuore a quei due “disgraziati” 🙂 che mi fanno tornare indietro nel tempo. Daniele e Davide, la storia sta per volgere al termine. Ma quello che avete scritto non ha un termine ed è qua, per essere letto e riletto da “vecchi e giovani”, oggi e domani.

    Thanks.
    Lauro.

Lascia il tuo commento

*

Captcha * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.